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The Canterbury Tales - Florida State University

Poet Geoffrey Chaucer was born circa 1340, most likely at his parents’ house on Thames Street in London, England. Chaucer’s family was of the bourgeois class, descended from an affluent family who made their money in the London wine trade. According to some sources, Chaucer’s father, John, carried on the family wine business.

SparkNotes: The Canterbury Tales

/ But when my legal documents and formal reproaches were all fully sealed

54 Until after the death of that drooper who was useless in bed

55 When he a whole year was curbed and needed sexual passion

56 As if with man's sexual dealings I were done for the rest of my life

57 Lines 429-30: To see what man is best brawned or broadest in shoulders / Or forged is most strongly to provide a [sexual] banquet

58 We present ourselves in such a way as to deceive men of the truth

59 I am so piteous to the poor when there are many people

60 And many glance inside who sit far on the outsideAbbreviations

Ar: Arundel MS
As: Asloan MS
B: Bannatyne MS
BD: Bannatyne Draft MS
Bw: Bawcutt, Poems of William Dunbar (1998), 2 vols.
CM: Chapman and Myllar Print
CT: Canterbury Tales
DOST: Dictionary of the Older Scottish Tongue
HF: House of Fame
IMEV: Brown and Robbins, Index of Middle English Verse
K: Kinsley, William Dunbar: Poems (1957)
LGW: Legend of Good Women
Mc: Mackenzie, Poems of William Dunbar (1932; rev.

SparkNotes: The Canterbury Tales: Context

This verse echoes the famous line used several times in The Canterbury Tales that

/ But when my legal documents and formal reproaches were all fully sealed

54 Until after the death of that drooper who was useless in bed

55 When he a whole year was curbed and needed sexual passion

56 As if with man's sexual dealings I were done for the rest of my life

57 Lines 429-30: To see what man is best brawned or broadest in shoulders / Or forged is most strongly to provide a [sexual] banquet

58 We present ourselves in such a way as to deceive men of the truth

59 I am so piteous to the poor when there are many people

60 And many glance inside who sit far on the outsideAbbreviations

Ar: Arundel MS
As: Asloan MS
B: Bannatyne MS
BD: Bannatyne Draft MS
Bw: Bawcutt, Poems of William Dunbar (1998), 2 vols.
CM: Chapman and Myllar Print
CT: Canterbury Tales
DOST: Dictionary of the Older Scottish Tongue
HF: House of Fame
IMEV: Brown and Robbins, Index of Middle English Verse
K: Kinsley, William Dunbar: Poems (1957)
LGW: Legend of Good Women
Mc: Mackenzie, Poems of William Dunbar (1932; rev.

"Story," but also carrying the ironic meaning of "saint's life." Compare the comment of the merchant's wife to the monk in Chaucer's Shipman's Tale: "Thanne wolde I telle a legende of my lyf / What I have suffred sith I was a wyf" (CT VII[B2]145-46).

507-08 The practice of women being instructed by the secret teachings of other women and then following their advice is also reflected in The Wife of Bath's Prologue: "I folwed ay my dames loore, / As wel of this as of othere thynges moore" (CT III[D]583-84).

512-22 The narrator returns to the opening description of nature in all of its beauty and perfection, completing the framework which surrounds the women's conversation.

515 Silver schouris.

The Canterbury Tales: General Prologue & Frame Story

This verse echoes the famous line used several times in The Canterbury Tales that

Chaucer also parodies this sentiment with "hende" Nicholas' remark to Alisoun, "Ywis, but if ich have my wille, / For deerne love of thee, lemman, I spille" (CT I[A]3277-78).

501-02 The Widow, wittingly or unwittingly, is parodying the Beatitude from the Sermon on the Mount, "Blessed are the merciful, for they shall obtain mercy" (Matthew 5:7).

502 Sabot.

"Scratch his crooked back"; i.e., to "cause him pleasure," or to "flatter him." Compare the Cook's response to the Reeve in the Canterbury Tales: "For joye him thoughte he clawed him on the bak" (I[A]4326).

277 bler his .

She figures importantly in Chaucer's Merchant's Tale.  76 Dyane, the goddesse chaste of woddis grene.
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Geoffrey Chaucer Essay | Bartleby

Troilus and Criseyde is broadly considered one of Chaucer’s greatest works, and has a reputation for being more complete and self-contained than most of Chaucer’s writing, his famed The Canterbury Tales being no exception.

Geoffrey Chaucer Biography | List of Works, Study …

The Canterbury Tales is by far Chaucer’s best known and most acclaimed work. Initially Chaucer had planned for each of his characters to tell four stories a piece. The first two stories would be set as the character was on his/her way to Canterbury, and the second two were to take place as the character was heading home. Apparently, Chaucer’s goal of writing 120 stories was an overly ambitious one. In actuality, The Canterbury Tales is made up of only 24 tales and rather abruptly ends before its characters even make it to Canterbury. The tales are fragmented and varied in order, and scholars continue to debate whether the tales were published in their correct order. Despite its erratic qualities, The Canterbury Tales continues to be acknowledged for the beautiful rhythm of Chaucer’s language and his characteristic use of clever, satirical wit.

Geoffrey Chaucer and His Effect on the English Language

The legendary 14th century English poet Geoffrey Chaucer died October 25, 1400 in London, England. He died of unknown causes and was 60 years old at the time. Chaucer was buried in Westminster Abbey. His gravestone became the center of what was to be called Poet’s Corner, a spot where such famous British writers as Robert Browning and Charles Dickens were later honored and interred.

Essay about Geoffrey Chaucer - 461 Words | Majortests

"There is no record of any religious drama in England previous totheNorman Conquest. About the beginning of the twelfth century we hear ofa play of St. Catharine performed at Dunstable by Geoffroy, later abbotof St. Albans, and a passage in Fitzstephen's "Life of Becket" showsthat such plays were common in London about 1170. These were evidently"miracle plays",though for England the distinction between miracles andmysteries is of no importance, all religious plays being called"miracles". Of miracle plays in the strict sense of the word nothing ispreserved in English literature. The earliest religious plays wereundoubtedly in Latin and French. The oldest extant miracle in Englishis the (thirteenth century). Its subject is the apocryphaldescent of Christ to the ,and it belongs to the cycle of Easter-plays. From the fourteenthcentury dates the play of "Abraham and Isaac". A great impetus wasagain given to the religious drama in England as elsewhere by theinstitution of the festival of Corpus Christi (1264; generally observedsince 1311) with its solemn processions. Presently the Eastern and cycles were joined into one great cycle representing the whole courseof sacred history from the Creation to the Last Judgment. Thus arosethe four great cycles still extant and known as the Towneley, Chester,York, and Coventry plays, the last three designated from the place oftheir performance. The Towneley mysteries owe their name to the factthat the single manuscript in which they are preserved was long in thepossession of the Towneley family. They were performed, it seems, atWoodkirk, near Wakefield. These cycles are very heterogeneous incharacter, the plays being by different authors. In their present formthe number of plays in the cycles is: Towneley 30 (or 31), Chester 24,York 48 Coventry 42. Four other plays are also preserved in the Digbycodex at Oxford. The so called "moralities" (q. v.) are a lateroffshoot of the "miracles". These aim at the inculcation of ethicaltruths and the are abstract personifications,such as Virtue, Justice, the Seven Deadly Sins, etc. The charactercalled "the Vice" is especially interesting as being the precursor of fool. After the Reformation the miracle plays declined, thoughperformances in some places are on record as late as the seventeenthcentury."

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